Sugar question

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autumn95 autumn95
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Sugar question

I'm curious to know opinions about sugar addiction.  Do you think it's possible for a sugar addict to ever have sweets without problem?  If sugar didn't exist I would be thin.  I've tried so many times to give it up.  I feel so hopeless.  I've been to a 12 step program and therapy....countless diets since I was 10 years old (38 now).  I love my husband and he loves me but he'd prefer I was thin.  I'm 5'4" and 225 lbs.  I started bingeing between the ages of 5 and 6 when my parents split up.  It is so ingrained.  I can't remember an hour in my life that I wasn't thinking of my size/weight.  I am so exhausted.  The only time I was not overweight (2 lbs below "overweight" to be exact) was when I got married.  We dated and married within a year and it was the first time I was so anxious I couldn't eat except for a week when my postpartum depression with my first child was really bad (I have 4 kids now).  But even then I was bingeing on sugar at times.  Then I got mononucleosis.  I actually had it on my wedding day but didn't know it.  I was sick for a year and gained all the weight back and then some over the years.  I've always been prone to infection and get sick often.  
I want to show my children balance, but I'm not sure what that is....and truly, pretty much any diet guru...eating plan...whatever you want to call it....has their own "research" to back their claims.  I know....I've read them all and tried most of them, but I admit the next claim gets me and I switch.  I am not consistent.  Sugar always calls me back and I am thrown off for weeks, months, years sometimes.  
I want to change.  I want to give my husband that gift.  He is a good man.  He has stood by me through all my illnesses.  And I have stood by him through alot of his issues and we are still very much in love. I don't want anyone to have to take care of me because of my choices...and I do know they are MY CHOICES but I have not figured out how to stay consistent and refuse the call of the sugar-siren.
I think I will do better with a lower carb plan.  I just do not know how to deal with the sugar.  Is it in "occasionally"...whatever that means or do I give it up "for good" knowing I probably can't.
I am scared to push "post".  Haha!  So, let me have it....
Regardless, I need a place for accountability.  
Time plus consistency equals change
Mme.X Mme.X
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Re: Sugar question

Hi, Autumn95! Thank you for posting. First, let me say that you sound like wonderful person: self-aware, thoughtful, loving, and courageous.

Next, I can't really give advice because I don't have a sugar addiction and have not struggled with one. However, I did read an article last year in the New York Times Sunday Magazine about why sugar is basically toxic, and--whatever else anyone else might suggest--it might be interesting just to read it, even though I realize that everyone's addictions (and we all have them, in some form) probably have more to do with one's habits (which need to be very gradually changed) than with rational intellect (that looks for blazing epiphanies). Here's the link: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/17/magazine/mag-17Sugar-t.html?pagewanted=all

There are some great people on this site and I'm sure that they'll all chip in their thoughts and support, too.

Meanwhile, good luck! You can do it!
Madame X (detail), John Singer Sargent, 1883–84, oil on canvas, 82 1/8 x 43 1/4 in. (208.6 x 109.9 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Andrea T Andrea T
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Re: Sugar question

In reply to this post by autumn95
Hi Autumn! I'm a former sugar addict, too, and at least with me, the answer is yes. Not  to say I've been 100% or ever will be but hey, we're human. It was so much easier to tackle  the emotional baggage once I didn't have that annoying  constant carb/ sugar hunger ( meaning processed sugars. I don't get the same reaction from fruit or some grains, like corn)

I know what you mean by switching. I'm usually switching between Atkins ( easiest but  sometimes I feel it has too much leeway for low carb junk food) Primal and Paleo ( The hardest. I can  hold on for a few months  of this at a time but it starts to feel  too  confining, especially on a tight budget and time allowance) I'm hoping  to eventually settle somewhere into Primal for good when budget and life allows. Just pick what works for you and what is easiest to stay consistent with.

There are some very good sugar free replacements out there for most of the sugar stuff  people binge on. Trust me, one binge on sugar alcohols and you learn a lesson fast. Just uh...don't make any plans for the next few hours. The great thing about the sugarfree products is that they don't give you the sugar high, so you can actually separate out if you like/want something because of the taste, or if it was the sugar buzz you were  after. What worked for me was to make a substitute for what I wanted like a protein shake that tasted like a dessert.

disappointed disappointed
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Re: Sugar question

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autumn95 wrote
I'm curious to know opinions about sugar addiction.  Do you think it's possible for a sugar addict to ever have sweets without problem?  If sugar didn't exist I would be thin.  I've tried so many times to give it up.  I feel so hopeless.  I've been to a 12 step program and therapy....countless diets since I was 10 years old (38 now).  I love my husband and he loves me but he'd prefer I was thin.  I'm 5'4" and 225 lbs.  I started bingeing between the ages of 5 and 6 when my parents split up.
You sound just like my wife.  She also has the sugar addiciton problem.  There was a lot of violence in her house growing up so she turned to sugar and white flour as the drug of choice to help her cope.  And this habit followed her into her adult years as a way of coping with stress in general.

I think that the answer to your question is that if you are a sugar addict, you will neve be able to have sugar in your diet again.  Even just a little bit of sugar is going to trigger your addiction.  Just like an alcoholic can easily fall off the wagon by having just one drink.

I firmly believe that sugar ought to be reclassified as a drug.  See this web site for an interesting read on the subject:
http://www.lurj.org/article.php/vol1n1/sugar.xml.

Have you ever tried Stevia, the natural sweetener alternative with 0 calories and 0 glycemic index?  I think that is your best bet.  Stevia does not hit any of the receptors in your brain that sugar and other drugs hit, so you don't get that "drug fix" effect from Stevia, only the sweet taste.  See this website for more information on Stevia: http://www.stevia.com/.  You can find Stevia and products containing Stevia at your local health food store.

Good luck with your battle against sugar!
LiveLifeWell LiveLifeWell
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Re: Sugar question

I think that the answer to your question is that if you are a sugar addict, you will neve be able to have sugar in your diet again.  Even just a little bit of sugar is going to trigger your addiction.  Just like an alcoholic can easily fall off the wagon by having just one drink.

This is absolutely 100% true!  I myself am not a sugar addict and never have been.  I do not eat sugar - or anything "white" for that matter - however, if I slip up and indulge in half a donut, or a cupcake, or a piece of a snickers bar I find myself craving the taste, when it's not something I even especially like or need.  Hence why I choose to simply stay away from it.  The less you eat it, the less you will want it.  Trust me.  If I am out to dinner and really want to indulge in a desert I limit myself to 3 bites, it's enough to taste and enjoy, but I'm not "over" indulging.  However, an addict may not be able to do that.  Now for me,  if it was potato chips - different story!

As for Stevia it took me a minute to get used to it, I was a big Splenda fan for a long time but no longer wanted the chemicals in my body, so I switched and I love it.

Unfortunately, as with any addictive substance you have to eliminate it from your life for a REALLY long time so your body can get over the cravings.  You'll need to get your "fix" from natural fructose - fruit.  Or as mentioned, Stevia added to other things.  You may be able to EVENTUALLY get to the point where you can a three bite desert, but then again, maybe not.  You'll have to gauge that with time.  A looooong time.

Good luck!
mountain mountain
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Re: Sugar question

In reply to this post by autumn95
Hello there and I am impressed with your post...your attitude is amazing.
Now to your question.
I am pretty sure, that you are not just addicted to sugar. Sugar always comes with fat and both together (plus salt) are the most addictive substances in re to food.
Please check out www.drmcdougall.com, this is not a diet (which I would never ever recommend since diets don't work for a lifetime). It is the healthiest way of eating plus you will lose the weight without ever feeling hungry....plus it doesn't cost you more than the food you can buy in every grocery store.
I wasn't really much overweight (5'9" and weighed at my heaviest 175 lbs )but I lost 40 lbs and I am down to my teenager weight (and I am 56) and look amazing...blush...blush..blush....and I still eat that way. I haven't been hungry one day on this eating plan.
Give it 2 months and I bet you will keep going. And join us in the forum over there!.
autumn95 autumn95
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Thank you all for your kind words and advice!!!  It has really boosted my spirits this week!

Mde. X  I think you're right about the "blazing epiphanies"...I am always looking for those and I think it's time to realize this is just going to take habitual hard work. I read the article about sugar that you and Disappointed recommended.  It was scary!!  I have to agree with it though...there is something habit-forming there and dangerous.  All I know is there is a definite whole body response going on when I eat sugar and it is a vicious cycle.

Disappointed I haven't looked into stevia yet but I will!  My father is an alcoholic and I definitely used food to cope growing up like your wife did.  To this day I can't go in his house and not feel like hiding somewhere and eating....thankfully I'm not there often.  I love him but he can't help himself and no one else can help him either.  I don't want my addiction to sugar to alienate my children from me like his addiction has.  The effects of the addiction may be different but it still will shape them if they learn their habits from me.

 And Andrea, you are an inspiration.  I've been looking through your posts and am encouraged by what you have accomplished.  

Hubby and I have decided to try to do this together.  He has some to lose, not near as much as me but he's 8 years older than me and feels his energy is lagging and wants to see if this will help. We are going to do calorie counting for now and make sure we're getting enough protein and fiber.  I have a friend who is a trainer and she agreed with this to start.  
I started working out this morning.

I am trying to watch some motivating things on youtube everyday, either the supersize v. superskinny shows or the Big meets Bigger shows....those are terrifying.

I'm just going to cut sugar out for now as suggested by so many of you and stop trying to be "moderate" with it.  It just doesn't work for me.  I'll look into stevia and some things like that.

I promised my husband I wouldn't stop fighting even if I have setbacks, so here's hoping I can keep moving forward and make some changes this time.

For now that's the plan!
Time plus consistency equals change
Andrea T Andrea T
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Re: Sugar question

Autumn, If you're still using splenda, hit the local restaurant supply stores for Da Vinci Syrups. They're usually a lot cheaper and in just about every flavor you can imagine and a  few I wish they hadn't (trust me- skip the root beer and the watermelon - BLEAH!) They're a  great basic ingredient when coming up with sugar-free  replacement recipes .
Mme.X Mme.X
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Re: Sugar question

In reply to this post by autumn95
Here is why you are going to succeed, A95:

1. You have a great attitude.
2. You have not one, but two partners in your task: your husband (he sounds terrific) and your friend, the personal trainer. I've tried working out (strength training for tone) but have found it really hard to keep up since I don't really like it and find it very hard to motivate myself. If just one other person were there to keep tabs on me and tell me what to do so that I don't damage myself in the process, I'd do it! But I can't afford it (we really are strapped for cash, and my daughter's therapy takes priority over mommy's recreational needs). But you have such a person for yourself--for free! It's wonderful.
3. You have a great attitude.

Keep us posted. We're inspired already.
Madame X (detail), John Singer Sargent, 1883–84, oil on canvas, 82 1/8 x 43 1/4 in. (208.6 x 109.9 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
autumn95 autumn95
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Re: Sugar question

First week lost 2.8 lbs.  I haven't been perfect with sugar but I have stayed within my calorie limit every day.
I am inspired and just keep reminding myself that there is no mystery (no blazing epiphanies Mde. X! That was so good for me to hear!) that if I stay within these limits I can acheive my goal.  
My anniversary is Aug. 12 and I want to be able to tell my husband I've lost 15 pounds by then :)

Thanks Andrea for the info about Davinci syrups.  I will try them!
Mde. X I hear you about the money.  My friend is advising me from afar on diet (she lives away) but I am doing videos at home to work out and walking too.

Thank you all for the encouragement!!
Time plus consistency equals change
Mme.X Mme.X
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Re: Sugar question

Madame X (detail), John Singer Sargent, 1883–84, oil on canvas, 82 1/8 x 43 1/4 in. (208.6 x 109.9 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Diet Coach Diet Coach
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Andrea T Andrea T
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Diet Coach,
         If all you care about is that the fatties lose weight, why mess with something that's  working? I've  seen you do this on CPH. A  dieter gets  exited that  they're losing weight, and  because they're not doing it  your way, or admitting they're a  glutton, you have  to pour water over their efforts.

It's a Mean Girls quote but it's actually appropriate since you act like a Jr high bully  fairly often:

"Calling someone fat won't make you any skinner. Calling someone stupid doesn't make you any smarter. Ruining someone's life won't make yours any better. The only thing that you can do in life is solve the problem that's in front of you."

That's what she's doing, so lay off.
autumn95 autumn95
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Re: Sugar question

It must be supposed then, that ONE should refer to ONESELF in the third person when making introductions....if ONE happens to be fat that is...


Thanks Andrea :)

Time plus consistency equals change
Andrea T Andrea T
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Re: Sugar question

Something he overlooks is that when it comes to weight loss, hard facts are very difficult to find and prove. You can even find some studies that "prove" that long term weight loss is impossible.So in the end, it's about what works for you- and that includes the motivation.  So it's all a matter of opinion and  belief, the "I me my". My belief is that it's  plain arrogant to pull an opinion  from your backside and present it as fact.

He said it someplace else " Shut up and stay on your diet" I hate whining,  but relearning to cook,  trying new  workouts, that's a hobby. It's enjoyable to talk about that kind of thing, and thinking about weight as  a punishment ...or "I do it all for my family/ spouse" just encourages someone to feel  like a martyr. Who wants to live around THAT?
disappointed disappointed
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Diet Coach wrote
Since fat contains 9 calories per gram and protein and carbs contain 4 and since eating enough protein to maintain a normal weight is impossible you are eating too much fat and fat fattens best.
"Fat fattens best" is not necessarily true.  Fat+carbs fattens best for sure, but fat alone, maybe not.  Each person has their own genetic variability which means each person will have their own "optimal" ratio of carbs/protein/fat that will work for them.  Some people run better on a higher ratio of carbs to fat, whereas others run better on a higher ratio of fat to carbs.  It all depends on what works for you.  So experimentation is the key.

In my case, I have found that carbs make me fat and fat makes me skinny.  It is scientifically proven that carbs are metabolized differently than fat; one obvious difference is that fat does not trigger an insulin response whereas carbs do.  One calorie of carbs might not be treated in the same way as one calorie of fat due to the difference in their chemical composition and what the body has to do to get the energy that it contains.  Our metbolisms have a tendency to want to convert glucose to fat so as to get the blood sugar down, one result of the insulin response.  

When I was eating more carbs and less fat, I ballooned to 230 pounds and my cholesterol was through the roof.  Now I eat more fat than carbs and my weight is in the 180-190 range and my cholesterol is low.

When you take a look at farms, where cows and pigs are raised for meat, they are fed corn and other high-carb feed products to fatten them up.  I've never seen a farmer feed his cows and pigs blocks of butter to fatten them up.

I have found through my own personal experience that carbs make me feel bloated but yet still hungry whereas fat does not make me feel bloated and my hunger is satisfied.  

It's different for everyone, but what I always say is that if what "they" tell you to do does not work for you, then try the opposite.  What have you got to lose?  You know that if you keep doing what you've been doing, you'll get the same result, so why not try the opposite?  In my case, it worked, but then again, I did not have a sugar addiction problem to beat as well, I just changed my eating habits.  It's a lot harder when you're addicted to sugar and starch.

All I'm saying is "give fat a chance, you never know."

See these links for more information:
http://www.alsearsmd.com/the-skinny-on-fat/
http://www.alsearsmd.com/busting-3-fat-loss-myths/

Good luck.
autumn95 autumn95
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Re: Sugar question

Lost 1.6 lbs this week
Happy 4th everyone!
Time plus consistency equals change
yorktown38 yorktown38
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yorktown38 yorktown38
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Mme.X Mme.X
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Hiya, Autumn. How's it going? We're sending strong and encouraging thoughts your way...
Madame X (detail), John Singer Sargent, 1883–84, oil on canvas, 82 1/8 x 43 1/4 in. (208.6 x 109.9 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
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